2014 Holiday Greeting Cards
 

For each donation of $10 or more to help injured and orphaned wild birds, we will send a beautiful full-color holiday card to someone on your list. Each card features a photo of an actual Alabama Wildlife Center patient, along with a story about its care. Your gift helps wild birds in need: $10 helps care for 2 birds a week; $20 helps care for 3 birds a week; $30 helps care for 4 birds a week.

On the order form, please indicate how many of each design you wish to order and the gift amount ($10, $20 or $30) for each. Along with the order form, please include a list of your recipients' names and addresses. If ordering more than one design, be sure to indicate your design choice for each person on your list.

You can email your completed order form and list of recipients to wildlife@awrc.org or you can click here to print an order form to mail or fax.

Please allow two weeks for delivery. Shipping is domestic only via USPS first-class mail. All shortages and damages must be reported within 30 days. All orders must be received by December 17 to assure delivery before Christmas.

The five cards feature the birds and their stories below:

 

Anhinga

#1 Anhinga
Anhinga anhinga

This Anhinga was found on a remote lake in rural Alabama. He was transported to the Alabama Wildlife Center where it was discovered that he had sustained a severe break to one of his wings. This unusual patient quickly adapted to his new surroundings and began eating heartily, consuming almost fifty fish every day! Under the watchful eye and diligent care of AWC volunteers and staff, the Anhinga continues on the road to recovery and back to his rightful place in the wild.
 
The Anhinga is a truly unique and remarkable bird. Its long, slender neck and fanned tail have earned it the nicknames of Water-Turkey and Snake-Bird. A rare site on Alabama lakes and streams, the Anhinga is more commonly found in the southern parts of Florida and in Central and South America. This interesting patient was truly a first for the Alabama Wildlife Center.


Photo by Mary Stockard


 

Wood Duck

#2 Wood Duck
Aix Sponsa
 
This beautiful male Wood Duck was brought to the Alabama Wildlife Center as a hatchling after becoming separated from his family. Though he was cold and weak upon arrival, AWC volunteers and staff quickly perked him up with fluids, food, and warm blankets. He soon found an adoptive family with four other orphaned Wood Ducks already in residence at the Alabama Wildlife Center who readily accepted him into their flock. Once he had reached maturity, this handsome duck and his newfound family were released into the wild together.
 
The Wood Duck is one of Alabama’s most striking waterfowl. Males are easily recognizable by their iridescent, chestnut and green feather pattern, with females having more subdued coloration. While they are quite secretive and prefer wooded, swampy habitats, it is always a treat to see one of these colorful birds on Alabama’s lakes.
 
Photo by Mary Stockard


 

Great Horned Owl

#3 Great Horned Owl
Bubo virginianus
 
This striking Great Horned Owl came to the Alabama Wildlife Center as a tiny nestling after falling out of her nest. As she grew larger and stronger under the care of AWC volunteers and staff, it became apparent that her vision was somewhat impaired. This condition is likely a congenital birth defect. With this knowledge, AWC began to train her for a life as an education ambassador. In this role, she will have the opportunity to educate the public about the amazing attributes of Great Horned Owls, and empower people to protect these amazing animals that can be found in their own backyards.
 
Great Horned Owls are Alabama’s largest owl species. They are easily distinguished by their large yellow eyes, as well as the feather tufts on top of their heads. Though the Great Horned Owl’s wingspan can reach over four and a half feet, it is completely silent in flight. This allows the bird to soar soundlessly through the night in search of prey. This amazing owl is a top predator in Alabama’s ecosystem, and the Alabama Wildlife Center is proud to care for a number of Great Horned Owls every year.
 
Photo by Mary Stockard























 

Bald Eagle
#4 Bald Eagle
Haliaeetus leucocephalus
 
This breathtaking adult Bald Eagle was brought to the Alabama Wildlife Center after a harrowing rescue by boat! The rescue team braved pouring rain, gusting winds, and cold temperatures to capture the Eagle and get her to safety at AWC. Once admitted, a careful examination revealed that, thankfully for this Bald Eagle, her only apparent injury was damage to her talons. Unfortunately, she was also suffering from severe malnutrition. AWC volunteers and staff were able to immediately rehydrate and warm the Eagle and stabilize her condition.
 
The Bald Eagle has long been a symbol of strength and power, and for good reason. The wingspan of a female Bald Eagle can reach almost eight feet. These majestic birds were almost erased from the skies due to pesticides, habitat loss, and hunting but have made a strong comeback with protection and education about their plight. AWC is privileged to rescue, rehabilitate and release such an amazing animal!
 
Photo by AWC Staff






Great Horned Owl

#5 Great Horned Owl
Bubo virginianus
 
This striking Great Horned Owl came to the Alabama Wildlife Center as a tiny nestling after falling out of her nest. As she grew larger and stronger under the care of AWC volunteers and staff, it became apparent that her vision was somewhat impaired. This condition is likely a congenital birth defect. With this knowledge, AWC began to train her for a life as an education ambassador. In this role, she will have the opportunity to educate the public about the amazing attributes of Great Horned Owls, and empower people to protect these amazing animals that can be found in their own backyards.
 
Great Horned Owls are Alabama’s largest owl species. They are easily distinguished by their large yellow eyes, as well as the feather tufts on top of their heads. Though the Great Horned Owl’s wingspan can reach over four and a half feet, it is completely silent in flight. This allows the bird to soar soundlessly through the night in search of prey. This amazing owl is a top predator in Alabama’s ecosystem, and the Alabama Wildlife Center is proud to care for a number of Great Horned Owls every year.
 
Photo by Mary Stockard


Click here to print an order form to mail or fax.